PowerPoint Compatible Audio and Video File Formats

– Multimedia (Audio & Video) file formats that supported by PowerPoint

Comfort and convenience are what in current computer technology. With computer-riding multimedia converters (e.g. Moyea PPT to Video Converter) or screen recorders (like Camtasia Studio), it is duck soup for you to transform a PowerPoint presentation to distinct video and extract or convert a favored sound from PowerPoint to a desired audio format. Nevertheless, when trying to put a song or a video clip to your PowerPoint presentation, you may strike a snag – The sound can’t be recognized by PowerPoint´╝üThe video clip shows no graphics! What is the problem? You are probably inserting a song or video with improper file format to the PowerPoint.

To solve the problem of format incompatibility, you should know what multimedia formats can be applied to your PowerPoint. You will not be able to play the song or video in your presentation unless converting it to a PowerPoint-supported file format. Below lists all multimedia formats that you can use in MS PowerPoint, categorized by audio and video. Have a quick browse to see whether yours is included.

Add audio and video files to PowerPoint

Audio File Formats Compatible with PowerPoint

  • AIFF Audio file (*.aiff): Audio Interchange File Format
    A sound format originally used on Apple and Silicon Graphics (SGI) computers. Waveform files are stored in an 8-bit monaural (mono or one channel) format that is not compressed and can result in large files.
  • AU Audio file (*.au): UNIX Audio
    Often used to create sound files for UNIX computers or the Web
  • MIDI file (*.mid or *.midi): Musical Instrument Digital Interface
    A standard format for the interchange of musical information between musical instruments, synthesizers, and computers
  • MP3 Audio file (*.mp3): MPEG Audio Layer 3
    A faddy digital audio encoding format of lossy data compression, used for consumer audio storage and the transfer and playback of music on digital audio players
  • Windows Audio file (*.wav): Wave Form
    An audio file format that stores sounds as waveforms. Depending on various factors, one minute of sound can occupy as little as 644 kilobytes or as much as 27 megabytes of storage.
  • Windows Media Audio file (*.wma): Windows Media Audio
    A sound file compressed by the Microsoft Windows Media Audio codec, a digital audio coding scheme developed by Microsoft that is used to distribute recorded music, usually over the Internet.
  • Video File Formats Compatible with PowerPoint

  • Windows Media file (*.asf): Advanced Streaming Format
    A file format that stores synchronized multimedia data and can be used to stream audio and video content, images, and script commands over a network.
  • Windows Video file (*.avi): Audio Video Interleave
    One of the most popular multimedia file formats for storing sound and moving pictures in Microsoft Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) format. The AVI format has audio or video content compressed with a wide variety of codecs.
  • Movie file (*.mpg or *.mpeg): Moving Picture Experts Group
    This is an evolving set of standards for video and audio compression developed by the Moving Picture Experts Group. This file format was designed specifically for use with Video-CD and CD-i media.
  • Windows Media Video file (*.wmv): Windows Media Video
    This file format compresses audio and video by using the Windows Media Video codec, a tightly compressed format that requires a minimal amount of storage space on your computer’s hard disk.
  • Got it? If your sound or video insert is not listed above, convert it to a supported file format by using some third-party conversion programs or utilities. For instance, the free online Media Converter, standalone Leawo Free Video Converter, etc.

    Note: Your sound or video insert may not work in PowerPoint if you haven’t installed the right codec or if the file codecs are not recognized by your OS, even if you have the same file format as one listed above.

    Related posts:

    1. How to Insert iTunes Music into PowerPoint Presentation
    2. How to Recover a Corrupt PowerPoint File?
    3. Sound in PowerPoint Strikes on another Computer
    4. A Concise Collection of PowerPoint to Video Solutions
    5. How to Edit Recorded Narration for PowerPoint Slides

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